Pâte de Coing in English Quince Paste Recipe

Quince Paste Recipe is a typical winter recipe for many Mediterranean countries. You can eat it as a candy, on a piece of bread or like they do in Spain with Manchego cheese. 

Quince paste recipe Jump to Recipe 

It is called Pâte de Coing in French, Cotognata in Italian and Membrillo in Spanish.

The flavour is very distinctive, halfway between a pear and an apple, and because the quince has a high content of pectin, the paste is firmer than a jam.

Quince paste will last for at least 3 months, so you can make a batch before Christmas and have a sweet snack ready anytime.

 

Quince is practically an apple, but cannot be eaten raw as it is very hard and bitter.

But once cooked its taste is sweet and fruity.

 

Coing Quince Cotogna

boil the quince for 30 minutes

I check out different recipes in different languages, and I found different versions.

Some peel the apples, some cook them whole; some add the sugar others add the caramel.

But the end result looks the same.

The Italian and the French recipes are very similar, so I follow them.

I boiled the apple without cutting and peeling them, and added caramel to the pulp.

To make this recipe I use KitchenAid attachment 5FVSP Fruit and vegetable Strainer 

You can find it on Amazon (affiliate link)

I find it very useful to sieve cooked fruits, tomatoes and potatoes. It separates the skin directly so I don’t have to peel them.

Here, more of my favourite kitchen tools

Cut in slices and let them dry

Once it is ready I cut it into slices and let them dry.

I cover them with kitchen foil and keep it in the fridge.

When the boys want a snack, they can help themselves.

5 from 5 votes
Cut in slices and let them dry
Print

Quince Paste Recipe
Prep Time
20 mins

Cook Time
1 hr

Total Time
1 hr 20 mins

 

This is a typical winter recipe for many Mediterranean countries. You can eat it as a candy, on a piece of bread or like they do in Spain with Manchego cheese. It will last for 3 months 

Course:

Canned & Jam
Cuisine:

French, Italian, Mediterranean, Spanish
Servings: 1 kilo
Calories: 2677 kcal

Ingredients
  • 3
    quince
  • 630
    gr
    sugar
    same amount as the weight of the quince
  • 400
    water

Instructions
  1. Boil the quince as they are, without peeling them or cutting them for about 30/35 minutes. They have to be soft but not  too mushy

    boil the quince for 30 minutes
  2. Sieve them on a fruit strainer. I use the KitchenAid attachment so I don't have to peel them

    homemade apricot jam sieving
  3. Weight the pulp, I got 625 gr with 3 quince

  4. Take the same amount of sugar and make the caramel. For 625 gr of sugar, I used 400 ml of water. Bring the caramel to 120 C

  5. In the meantime cook the quince pulp over a pan of boiling water to remove as much water as possible

    Dry the quince paste over boiling water
  6. Add the caramel to the quince and cook for another 30 minutes continuing to stir

    Add the caramel to the quince
  7. Cover a rectangular mould with parchment paper and pour the quince past inside. Let it rest for 24 hours 

    Pour the Quince Paste into the mould
  8. The next day, remove the quince paste from the mould and cut it into slices or cubes

    remove the quince paste from its mould
  9. Let it dry and serve it as it is, on a slice of bread or as the Spanish do with a manchego cheese 

    Quince paste with bread and cheese

Recipe Notes

Calories 266 calories per serving Fat 11 gr per serving Carbohydrates 33 gr per serving Cholesterol 30 mg Proteins 12 gr per serving Sugar 7 gr per serving Sodium 4422 mg per serving 

Nutritional information is provided for general purpose only. It is not intended to amount to advice on which you should rely.

Quince Paste Recipe is a typical winter recipe for many Mediterranean countries. You can eat it as a candy, on a piece of bread or like they do in Spain with Manchego cheese. - Your Guardian Chef #quincepaste #PâtedeCoing #cotognata

  10 comments for “Pâte de Coing in English Quince Paste Recipe

  1. 29th December 2017 at 6:41 am

    I enjoy quince but have never cooked it at home. This is such a helpful post – thank you!

    • Laura
      29th December 2017 at 6:58 am

      thank you, I am glad you find it helpful

  2. 29th December 2017 at 8:49 am

    I live in Spain, so I know what quince paste is, but I’ve never even thought about making it from scratch before. Looks fab! Better than the stuff you get in the shops 🙂

    • Laura
      29th December 2017 at 9:12 am

      yes, it is easy and they last for at least 3 months

  3. 29th December 2017 at 9:18 am

    I really struggled to get into quince, we have a tree/bush at the end of our plot but give them away to neighbours who use it to flavour pálinka, a fruit brandy not dissimilar to Eau de Vie. I’ll have to give this a try.

    • Laura
      29th December 2017 at 9:23 am

      I really wish you were my neighbour, you would have a supply every winter

  4. 29th December 2017 at 10:15 am

    Looks delicious! I love quince!

    • Laura
      29th December 2017 at 12:50 pm

      thanks

  5. 29th December 2017 at 12:48 pm

    Sounds so tasty!!

    • Laura
      29th December 2017 at 12:50 pm

      thanks

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